Press

THE NEW YORKER

BURNS II

Swept by wildfires years ago, the northwestern Montana forests Nadel photographs are little more than blackened trunks, straight as telephone poles and stark naked against the snow. Nadel works with a large-format view camera, not unlike the equipment the pioneering Western landscape photographers used, so his pictures are astonishingly detailed but often flattened out. The snow turns the landscapes virtually black and white, like drypoint etchings; what little color remains—bits of green new growth, red branches against a charred trunk—comes as a pleasant shock. From a distance, the topography looks hairy and anatomical, full of fleshy folds and scars, a body still in shock.

Review by Vince Aletti, February 15, 2013

 

THE WALL STREET JOURNAL, February 8, 2013

 

THE NEW YORKER

BURNS

Nadel’s photographs of snow-covered forests in mountainous northwestern Montana that have been burned in wildfires look like ink drawings or etchings. From a distance, perspective collapses, and the leafless trees are nothing more than thousands of thin lines – tough whiskers on the landscape. Although these are color photographs, the effect is crisp, graphic black-and-white; even at closer range, the trees appear nearly colorless. Working with a traditional four-by-five view camera, Nadel turns out images with a brilliant clarity that’s most remarkable in the smaller prints here, where the forest seems poised between devastation and rebirth.

Review by Vince Aletti, March 28, 2011

THE WALL STREET JOURNAL, February 26, 2011